Preventing Gum Disease – Alhambra, CA

Many people often ignore the early signs of gum disease, known as gingivitis, simply because they do not know what gingivitis is.

Gum disease plagues 75% of adult Americans and has been connected to serious diseases such as heart disease and stroke. Learn how to recognize gingivitis along with ways to halt and prevent gingivitis from progressing into a more serious form of gum disease.

Gingivitis is a reversible form of gum disease. It affects only the attached and free gingival tissue that surrounds your teeth, bacteria that invades the area below your gumline, known as the sulcus or periodontal pocket, causes gingivitis to develop and eventually manifest into periodontitis, if left untreated.The early warning signs of gingivitis are often mistaken as normal occurrences one should expect when it comes to the mouth. Symptoms of gingivitis include:

  • Bad breath
  • Red, puffy, and inflamed gums
  • Bleeding after brushing and flossing

Even though you may recognize these early warning signs as gingivitis, it is important that you book an appointment with your dentist for a check up. Why? There is a fine line between gingivitis and periodontitis. It is important to note that gingivitis is a reversible condition that is treated with professional cleanings to remove plaque and calculus build up, along with regular home maintenance that may include a prescribed antibacterial mouth rinse known as chlorhexidine gluconate.

Non-surgical Treatment of Gum Disease

 

Gum disease is fairly common, especially if the patient in concern does not make regular visits to the dentist. One of the most common forms of gum disease is gingivitis. Gingivitis occurs when bacterial plaque starts to build up in the gaps between the gum and the teeth. This buildup is called tartar, and although it may only be in small amounts, the bacteria the tartar carries can produce toxins to the body that cause the gums to inflame. If this form of gum disease is not addressed properly, the gaps between the teeth and the gums can become larger. This is something you really want to avoid because if the tartar buildup is too great it can eventually lead to tooth loss and even bone loss in the jaw. Regular cleanings can help you avoid this situation, but we can also help you if your gum disease is more advanced. We have a number of different non-surgical methods.  As with all of our procedures, these procedures are extremely comfortable. You do not have to fear having to decide between losing your teeth or undergoing painful surgery.

 

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Gum Disease and its Treatment

Posted February 28th, 2012 by Dr. Chao and filed in Gum Disease

Gum disease is fairly common, especially if the patient in concern does not make regular visits to the dentist. One of the most common forms of gum disease is gingivitis. Gingivitis occurs when bacterial plaque starts to build up in the gaps between the gum and the teeth. This buildup is called tartar, and although it may only be in small amounts, the bacteria the tartar carries can produce toxins to the body that cause the gums to inflame. If this form of gum disease is not addressed properly, the gaps between the teeth and the gums can become larger.

This is something you really want to avoid because if the tartar buildup is too great it can eventually lead to tooth loss and even bone loss in the jaw. Regular cleanings can help you avoid this situation, but we can also help you if your gum disease is more advanced. We have a number of different non-surgical methods.  As with all of our procedures, these procedures are extremely comfortable. You do not have to fear having to decide between losing your teeth or undergoing painful surgery.

Nonsurgical Treatment of Gum Disease – Alhambra, CA

Posted November 14th, 2011 by Dr. Chao and filed in Gum Disease

We use procedures like laser-assisted scaling and root planing in cases of gum disease and our technique has been quite effective. The scaling will help remove the tartar which has built up between the gum and the teeth and thus will remove the destructive bacteria that accompanies this.

In addition to this, we also use anti-bacterial home therapy coordinated with an intense, in-office program of infection control to address severe or hopeless cases. Most importantly, our success has been built upon our relationship with our patients. Our patients with severe, hopeless gum disease are informed of their critical role in infection control. We consistently teach our patients on various new ways to clean and remove infection from their teeth and gums with special FDA devices. We especially emphasize the need for regular follow-up treatment that is indispensable to a successful outcome. We are grateful for so many diligent, compliant patients with severe, hopeless gum diseases who have been able to save their teeth for the long-term without surgical intervention.